Posts Tagged ‘online marketing strategy’

Get Ready for 2011 SEO

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

The new year is almost upon us and 2011 will mean some major shifts in SEOland. Of course every year brings major search optimization shifts. Google makes 550 algorithm changes in a given year according to Wired magazine.

A big shift in 2010 heralds some of the changes for 2011. The Yahoo Bing merger of search results has given Bing a 25% share of the search market. Google still retains their 70%+ and will battle to maintain position, while Bing attempts to grab more market share.

So far we who toil in the SEOland trenches know that speed will be a factor in 2011. Slow loading sites and pages will suffer in the rankings. If your site relies on a slow loading Flash splash page, or your designer didn’t properly compress your image heavy pages, you will see your position erode throughout 2011.

We also know that Social Media will play a larger part in ranking algorithms. Those indicators have been creeping into search toolbars often called “Social Media Index”. We know that being mentioned in Twitter, Facebook, Digg and Technorati is monitored by Google and Bing, we don’t always know how it is affecting rankings.

One of the biggest changes we will be seeing in 2011 is the ability of Google to look at user interaction with a website and rank that site accordingly. Bounce rates, time on site, number of page views will all be a part of ranking. The signals are loud and clear – you will be judged by your industry standards. You must have a site worthy of visitors, or Google will not place your site in a position to attract those visitors via search.

What do you need to do to make it in the next year of search? Be distinct. Have unique value. Engage with your community and if you don’t have a community – build one.

Keep these four factors in mind as you look at your site from a search perspective.

  • How many good inbound links do you you have?
  • How well are you represented in social media?
  • How well do your users interact with your site?
  • How does your site compare to others covering the same subjects?

As we get into the next year, we will be heading inexorably towards the new ear of search. We will need to spend more time, effort and money on becoming Search Engine Marketers. The old “flavor of the week” game the system techniques have become less effective than ever, and 2011 may mark their permanent demise.  Gaming the system may still work somewhat, but the strategic goals of the search engines are working against it. Remember – Google and Bing have obscene piles of money to accomplish their goals. Helping them achieve those goals is in your best interests.

To do that we must think more like traditional marketers. Offer items of value, produce good content, engage your visitors. The engines are watching. They will take note of how valuable your site is to your community. Value will be rewarded.

The beauty of a more traditional marketing approach is that it will be kind to you as the years go by. As search engines improve algorithms they will do a better recognizing sites that are seen as valuable by users. Search optimization is a never ending task. There are thousands of competitors who are spending time and money trying to take over your position.

You can retain your position and improve upon it by using a holistic approach to your online marketing efforts. Then, the changes at the search engines make are likely to favor you at the expense of your competitors who take a more short-term tactical approach.

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The Most Important Part of Social Media

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Unless you’ve been buried in a snowbank in outer Mongolia for the past two years, you’ve heard how important social media sites like Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have become to your online marketing efforts. Yet many websites are not aware of the most important part of social media marketing.

Relevance and User Engagement

We’ve talked about relevant content before. Your content must be relevant to the user or they won’t find you in any type of a search. In Social Marketing, they wont’ come back to revisit you if your content isn’t relevant to their needs. But when you deliver engaging content to that visitor, they are more likely to stay on your page or click through to additional content.

Let’s take a typical example. You have a video playing on a page with ads. Your revenue stream from this page comes from ad views. If you include a relevant Tweet stream, you retain your viewers longer, thus increasing those ad views.

Let’s say you have 100,000 people watching that video, and a new ad is served every minute at $8 CPM, but you lose 50 percent of your audience halfway through the video. By adding that relevant Tweet stream, or user-generated video reviews you could retain half of those viewers you lose.

Let’s do the math. If you could retain half of those you lost – 25,000 viewers, and your video is 30 minutes long, and your CPM is $8 per minute,  you’d gain an additional $6,000 of revenue in an hour.

Seeing that participating social commentary can inspire the “herd effect”. The more people who comment on your video or reTweet it to their friends, the more people jump on the bandwagon and join in the commentary.

Loyalty also comes into play. If a customer has an engaging experience with your brand, they are far more likely to tell their friends about that experience. With the advent of social media, that circle of friends can run into some serious numbers!

Relevant and engaging social media can drive conversions. Let’s use a retail example. Let’s say your shoppers have access to tweets about a product while viewing the product page. You have 100,000 shoppers a day. If those tweets on products or brands bring the typical 3 percent site conversion up to 4 percent for that audience – with average order value of $200- you’d see $10,000 in revenue per day, or $3.6 million for the year. At 15 percent gross margin, that’s $547,000 of net profit.

The key to accomplishing these numbers is simple to state, but often ignored. Create engaging content. Add relevant social media. Serve in an easy to use page that invites even more relevant social commentary. That’s the recipe for social media revenue and conversion success.

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In SEO or Online Marketing Little Things Mean A Lot

Monday, December 6th, 2010

This past weekend I was buzzing around the net, checking on some SEO work and reading up on the never-ending changes in SEO Land. The normal arguments were going on in chat rooms, blog posts and comments. How much does Google want to see “this”? Is a three page checkout process one page too many? How badly does a lack of mobile ready pages hurt the bottom line?

As I rambled around the inter webz, I noticed there were over 400 MILLION pages competing for the key term I was checking. Seems like just last week there were a bare 100,000. An article caught my eye about mobile users hitting some astronomical figure by 2013. And I tried to buy something at a site that frustrated me with it’s multi page checkout process to the point of hitting the “cancel this transaction” button.

What do all these things have in common? Today, more than ever before, little things mean a lot. Competition is fierce, only 10 sites (or less in some cases) make it to the first page of Google for a keyterm. That’s 10 out of 400 million!

If you do get a customer to your checkout, you’ve won them from brick and mortar stores, online giants like Amazon and thousands of competitors. And they might have come to you from a smart phone – many sites are seeing mobile use in their stats that hit 10% or more of their monthly traffic.

Back in the early days when making money online was like picking up gold nuggets on a beach, details didn’t really matter all that much. The net was new, and customers would put up with poor checkout pages. They even went 3, 4 or more pages deep in a search session! Today, every detail counts.

No matter how well optimized a site, or how user friendly your purchase funnel may be, check these details or your competition will pull ahead of you.

Check the spelling – not only of your copy, but the all important meta title and description. I’ve seen keyterms misspelled in these areas which is great if you’re after a particular misspelling, but most folks aren’t. I even saw a site with the owner’s name spelled incorrectly throughout the pages!

Alt tags on images – do they count? A little. But if you and your competitor have sites of equal value doesn’t it make sense to do everything YOU can to tip the scales in your favor? Including making good use of the tags most site designers ignore?

Keywords in file names. Another little thing that most site designers and developers ignore are the names they assign images and page files. Do these count? A little. But hey – little things mean a lot! And instead of a bland “contact.html” or “logo1.jpg” it’s not hard to use “mykeytag.html” or “keyterm1.jpg”.

Go through your own checkout process. Are you standing in the way of a sale? Are you asking too much info from your customer? Are you using a dreaded captcha on a secure checkout page? That’s overkill and I can guarantee you will lose customers if they can’t read it and enter it right the first time.

Is your checkout process returning the right icon on the browser bar? In other words is it on a secure page with a properly updated SSL certificate? Nothing will stop the hand on the wallet faster than an error message popping up during checkout that says “this site may not be secure”.

Do you give the customer a clear message that their order has been received and is being processed?

Speaking of pages, do you have a custom “page not found” page? Do you politely inform your customer that they have reached a non existent page and give them a link back to your main page or a category page?

Does your site search work? I mean does it REALLY work? Does it come up with alternate spellings of a term or make suggestions? Does it politely or humorously let the customer know that term is not present in your site? Or is it a bare “search term not found” sort of page?

These are all little things, minor details, often overlooked. But with as competitive as the market has become, these little things can be the difference between being found and making a sale, or languishing in the middle of the pack of pages that are your online market.

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Online Marketing with Cyber Monday

Monday, November 29th, 2010

Welcome to Cyber Monday! If you survived Black Friday, the traditional shopping day that put’s retailers in the black for the first time in the year, you can follow up with Cyber Monday Steals and Deals.

Cyber Monday is when retailers with an online presence do deep discounting in an effort to match the frenzy of Black Friday. The National Retail Federation estimates 88% of online merchants will have deals, free shipping or participate in other ways in Cyber Monday.

ComScore, a digital marketplace research firm, expects online sales for the 2010 holiday season will reach $32.4 billion, marking an 11% increase over the previous year for the combined November-December gift-buying period.

Giant Amazon has fourth quarter sales forecasts ranging from $12 billion to $13.3 billion—an increase of 26% to 40% over Amazon’s fourth quarter sales of $9.5 billion in 2009.

Just how big are online Christmas sales numbers? The past two years, due to the economy are giving somewhat muddy numbers, but by any statistical analysis, holiday sales online are at least doubling every year. With sales projected to be at least 10% of all holiday shopping, within a year or two, experts expect online marketing efforts to account for one out of every four sales.

Furthermore, the average sale is also increasing. Last year saw it climb to $190 from the 2008 figure of $171.

Whether you sell hard goods or services, making 2011 the year you join the Amazon behemoth should be one of your iron clad New Year’s resolutions. No matter how you look at the numbers, Amazon has the lion’s share of the online sales pie. One of every $3 spent online goes to Amazon.

It’s not difficult to get eBooks, videos and hard goods into the Amazon Marketplace. Sure they take a cut, and yes there are rules. But the percentage isn’t bad and varies by the type of product and industry you are in.

Amazon has built an incredible level of trust with shoppers, which is a major factor in it’s success. Following those rules means Amazon continues to build that all important trust factor for your benefit as well as Amazon’s.

They have a wide variety of ways to move products. Offering everything from a quasi auction model to individual store fronts, Amazon covers all the bases. They even have low cost book publishing services and mass produced DVD’s. Go with a Kindle ready electronic version of your product, and have a paperback ready to ship as well.

How well does Amazon work for small business? I had a client a couple of years ago who went on Amazon based on my recommendations. In less than six months Amazon sales were half of the online store sales. In a year they were equal to the online store. Last year Amazon sales alone bypassed the brick and mortar sales for a store that had been place over 25 years.

Impressive? I think so. So did the owner who credits Amazon with saving his business. They didn’t even discount their products on Amazon. Main street store, online store, or Amazon – the prices were identical no matter where the shopper found the product. Nor were they the lowest. Other Amazon merchants were often 10-15% lower.

If you are looking for an online channel to garner more leads, more sales and more money with a minimal investment and low ongoing costs, you need to take a look at Amazon. It should be a part of every online marketers toolbox.

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Tis The Season For Internet Marketing

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

It’s here. It’s been creeping up. It’s been whispering sweet nothings in the ears of millions of shoppers. Yes it’s the time of the year to turn the bottom line from red to black – Black Friday!

Are you ready? Are your customer service lines staffed with friendly, knowledgeable people? Are your warehouses jammed with product? Is your site being found in the search engines for the right keyterms. Is it in the local directories? Is it mobile friendly?

Can users navigate to the products they want, filling their carts and then checking out with confidence that their details are safe? This is the time to turn the bad economy and lackluster sales around.

If you’re like many retailers and ecommerce companies your sales this year are vital to the continuation of your business. Whether you’re in a mall or on Amazon, the next 29 days can decide the future of your business.

With the season upon us, it’s too late to make any major changes now. But if you’re a brick and mortar store just thinking about coming online, maybe this factoid will help you embark on an online venture in January.

Recent studies published in The Real Cost of the Digital Divide state “being online adds up to almost $8,000 a year in savings– and that’s after taking the cost of being connected into account. While online shoppers may save more by being connected, online bargain hunters may still spend more money.

Who can blame online shoppers for handling Black Friday events from the comfort of their favorite living room chair? I know I do everything I can to avoid the crowded mall parking lots, wishing for a personal urban tank of my very own if I have to venture anywhere near them.

With the convenience of easy price comparisons, shipping guarantees, and no hassle checkout, it’s no wonder the internet has become the largest shopping mall ever imagined.

But if you are a retailer and you’re not online, you are missing out on those sales that could put the black into Black Friday. If you’re already online and not being found in the right places, not being sure your site is a part of the mobile explosion, and not using internet marketing techniques effectively, you could be wondering what all the fuss is about.

In the coming weeks you, dear reader, may get tired of hearing me say four words – social marketing and mobile friendly. But I and other internet SEO and marketing experts know that those two phrases are vital to your online success in 2011.

If your site is not mobile friendly you are ignoring the 100 million people who use Smart Phones. Let me give you a real world example that happened over the weekend. I was having lunch with my son’s fiancée and her sister and brother in law. All 20 somethings, they all had their iPhones and Droids handy. The girls were strategizing their Friday shopping, hitting  web sites for price comparisons, coupons, and deals. They had a list – broken into two columns. One side was “hit the mall” the other was “hit Amazon”.

They pulled up the mall map and marked the stores each would check, and detailed how and when they would stay in touch via phone to maximize their bargain hunting efforts. Fast forward to next year and the bar code readers that work within smart phones will be linked to the comparison sites. Perhaps even feeding the all important customer reviews into that screen as well as other relevant information like warranty limits or recall notices.

Some of their decisions were even made by browsing the company website. Laughter exploded as they looked at some stone age sites – “Ewww look at this thing. Would you EVER want to buy from a site that looks like that?”. “Oh good grief when will these guys stop doing things in Flash. I can’t see a single product pic. I’ll have to go to the store and hope they still have one.”

Mobile is big – it’s getting  bigger every day. It is a part of the shopping experience for many, and will become a mainstay of that experience in the years to come.

I know that Amazon is huge. I know this from my beloved stats. I know the net is made up of real people doing real things online. But to watch two real people bypass every website except Amazon while planning their shopping trip, was enlightening. If you aren’t on Amazon, get there – today. There is still time if you burn some midnight oil to become a part of this behemoth.

And seeing these young ladies checking Facebook pages for customer reviews and company interaction was also enlightening. A major retail chain which will remain nameless was a turnoff to these shoppers because of how they mismanaged a customer post.  Presence matters, but engagement matters more.

My wish for you, Mr. or Ms. Retailer, is that you have a stellar Christmas selling season so we can continue our conversation on engaging netizens and turning them into customers far into next year.

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Site Design DOES Matter

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

There is one area of internet marketing that is often overlooked. Site Design. While good navigation and a pleasing, easy to read page is conducive to converting lookers to buyers, recent changes at Google have made site design an even more important element of search engine optimization.

Google has always cared about the proper use of HTML and CSS code, page load times and other “backend” design elements, but with a recent test by Google, site design is about to become even more important to search results.

In the past couple of weeks Google has been experimenting with “page preview”. Enter a search term and click the magnifying glass next to a result to turn this feature on. Now scroll over the results and you’ll see something like the image below.

The keyword you entered will be highlighted on the page preview.

What effect will this new feature have on your online marketing efforts? Let’s look at two examples of a page preview.

Notice the broken Flash video image? The rest of this page isn’t bad, and it still could attract visitors. BUT the keyterms I entered to find this page are not highlighted within this preview. It won’t take long for visitors to start bypassing pages and sites that don’t have their key term prominently displayed and highlighted in the Google Page Preview.

Let’s look at another preview page.

I went to this page to find out why it was displaying so much white space. Java popups, old style html code and lack of CSS contributed to hide content from the page preview. This site – according to a quick look at it’s source code – is using site design style from the 1990’s. Do you think this page preview will result in visitors? Ummm probably not.

Most sites I review from an SEO perspective need some help. Titles, descriptions, code rewrites and other elements frequently need to be updated and redone. Most sites I see online are not “mobile friendly”. Many are confusing to visitors with poor navigation and overall site layout. But now the stakes have been raised. Now poor site design will be evident to everyone before they ever click your link in Google search results.

Make a New Years resolution to check your site and update as needed.

  • Check it in Google’s Site Preview
  • Use the index card or business card  test – how much of your site can be seen in a 3″ x 5″ or smaller area? That’s what a mobile device sees.
  • Dump Flash. Even if Apple were supporting it, it’s old, it’s tired, it’s a security risk and there are better, quicker, well supported alternatives to a Flash video.
  • Think “cross browser” and “cross platform” compatible. Be SURE your site can be seen on IE, FireFox, Safari and Chrome. Be SURE it’s Smart Phone and iPad ready.

And be SURE it looks inviting to the Page Preview browser! (HINT – Bing is also going the Page Preview route.) Spending the time to get a good ranking in Google and then losing the visitor to bad site design will mean your Christmas stocking will be full of coal next year.

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Internet Marketing Lessons My Sales Manager Taught Me

Monday, November 15th, 2010

A long time ago in what seems like a distant galaxy, far before the world of the internet, I had a most amazing sales manager. We were selling the first PC’s – Apple was only a scant 14 months out of the garage. And yet what this guy taught me was probably the best training for successful  internet marketing I ever got.

Ralph was an inveterate people watcher and we used to stand outside the store on the busiest street corner in Cleveland. Yes, Cleveland really did have foot traffic once upon a time and was the home to an astonishing number of Fortune 500 companies.

As people hurried by on their way to their cubicles and glass enclosed office suites, Ralph kept up a running commentary on what job they held, what their likes and dislikes were, even what they enjoyed doing  in their off time. Being fond of fact not fiction, I challenged Ralph to prove that he was right with what I considered to be guesses.

We started a “customer survey” with just five questions – what is your job title, do you use computers in your office, how long have your held your current position, with what you know about computers do you like them, hate them or are you afraid of them, and what do you do most in your off time.

We gave away an Apple logo’d sticky note pad and pen to everyone taking the survey. Ralph was incredibly accurate. The answers he gave for an individual before they took our survey had at least 3 of the 5 questions pegged correctly.

After about a week of running our little impromptu sampling I asked Ralph two questions. How was he able to size people up so quickly and how were those answers applicable to sales?

Ralph’s reply was that to successfully sell anything to anyone you had to know as much about them as possible in as short a time as practical. He would ask  seemingly friendly “warm up” questions to determine their level of computer experience, how they felt about computers in general, what “tribe” they belonged to, and anything else he could to determine exactly how he would respond to the customer and close the sale.

He also turned himself into that customer. He was a huge man – 6′ 4 and well over 200 pounds. But he could become a timid accountant in a heartbeat. His entire demeanor would change from the self confident sales leader into a hesitant, quiet, cubicle dwelling number cruncher. The prospect became comfortable with this mirror image of himself and would express his inner fears and sales objections, allowing Ralph to gently put them aside and close the sale.

If the self made tool and die millionaire wandered in, Ralph’s voice would boom through the store as he shook hands firmly with that kindred spirit. It was a lesson in the art and craft of salesmanship that I will always treasure.

When I began my online marketing career, Ralph’s lessons came to mind. I found that my most successful websites and clients were the ones that spoke the language of the unseen customer. The copy struck the right chords, resonating with the right “tribe” and matching the benefits to their objections,  and closing the sale.

Online marketing and salesmanship is more challenging than in person sales. The prospect is unseen, no visual cues are evident. But if you have truly taken the time to research your niche and it’s denizens, you know who they are, where they hang out, what is important to them and what product features they are interested in. You speak their language and walk their walk. By doing this, you identify yourself as a member of their “tribe” and build trust.

Yes, you understand their need. Yes, you are able to stop the pain and solve their problem because you understand THEM. You need the right keyterms to attract them to your site – the words they use, not necessarily the ones with the highest search volume.

If your market is fragmented – use landing pages to appeal to each segment. Use the language of that market segment to attract and engage. The voice in your copy needs to speak only to that segment, and not try to be all things to all people.

To paraphrase Caddyshack “be one with the customer, become the customer” and you will set sales records just like Ralph did.

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Is Your Brand New Site Already Old?

Friday, November 12th, 2010

I love marketing. It’s a constantly changing landscape powered by masses of real people, buying real products that change how they do business and run their lives.  When it comes to the net, predicting what will be “big” and what won’t is not usually very easy. I mean be honest here – did you actually think that little blue bird or Farmville would be the stuff fortunes are made of?

But other technology use can be a strong indication of things you should or should not do to capture the hearts and eyeballs of your visitors. I was in a large shopping mall the other day and began grumbling to myself about the Christmas promotions that were already in full swing. But then I started watching the people. Barnes and Noble had a throng of shoppers around their eReader while the rest of the store counters had few, if any, shoppers.

In the concourse, groups of people were gathered around the various cell phone kiosks. No trip to the mall is complete for me without a visit to the shrine of the fruit – The Apple Store. Here, the iPad displays had knots of people 5 deep waiting for their turn to play with that sleek addition to the Apple line.

Many other stores boasted staff members but no shoppers. I have a feeling smart phones, iPad devices and Kindle type readers are going to be under quite a few Christmas trees this year.

To date, 85 million iPhone and iPod touch devices have been sold to which you can add a predicted 7 million for iPads in its first year alone, according to iSuppli and Apple Insider. Simple math means that there are close to 100 million people using these devices. That number is sure to climb in the coming months.

But is your website ready for these visitors who may be giving up their laptop to browse the web via handhelds?

A recent study by Nielsen showed that by 2014, nearly 60 percent of the 142.1 million U.S. mobile population will access the Internet using mobile browsers. So, how does your site look to the 85.5 million mobile users who will see it from their mobile device?

Have you checked it across multiple platforms? Does it load quickly enough for a mobile user to see your content quickly? Does it pass the “business card” test? Hold a normal business card up to the screen – how much of your content will fit into that area?

Do you have a mobile friendly version of your site? Is it configured correctly so it “sniffs” out mobile visitors and serves that version of your site to them?

Apple iPad and iPhone users don’t see Flash. For about a year I’ve been preaching that Flash is on the way out. Videos and web site elements should not be done in venerable Flash. It has security flaws almost as bad as Microsoft, it isn’t seen by over 100 million users and there are better alternatives like HTML 5.0 and CSS 3.

Was your website written in HTML 5.0? Are your videos available in mobile surfing size?

Are your pages heavily laden with hundreds of lines of text? Mobile surfers browse – and they aren’t going to stick around for long if that page scrolls on forever in small, hard to read lines of text. Get to the point of the page and send them to another page if you have more info. Break your pages up into easily digested chunks of info – this is better for your SEO efforts and better for your mobile visitor.

Keep your copy short. It is true – nobody reads anymore, at least not a web site. Tests have shown that only 30% of the words on your page are actually read. Make sure that 30% are the most important words for your product or service.

CHECK YOUR ANALYTICS. Please check your stats. See where your visitors are coming from, what operating system they are using, what screen resolution they are surfing in. Mobile device use on your site stats will jump out at you, believe me.

Smart phones and tablet devices aren’t going to go away. But if your site isn’t ready for their use, your business just might.

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How Brick and Mortar Transfers to the Net

Monday, November 8th, 2010

Many business owners from the brick and mortar world come to the internet and feel that that it is alien territory, bearing no resemblance to anything they have handled in their previous brick and mortar world. Yet there are more similarities between online internet marketing and a store on Main Street than you might suppose.

Some business owners come to the online world thinking that like Jack, they have found a magic bean that will grow them an instant money tree. While in some rare cases this may happen, sales will grow over time online, just as they do on Main Street.

The net is not a replacement for a brick and mortar operation, at least not in the beginning. It is an enhancement. Old school brick and mortar techniques are still useful online.  The basics of marketing and advertising are still the same. The goal of attracting new customers and retaining and building old ones is still the goal of online marketing. The only difference is the marketing method.

Here are more similarities between the two:

Location. Your business location on Main Street is vital to foot traffic, your brand, your very presence in the area. Online your ranking – where you appear on the search page results is just as vital. Just like your brick and mortar location, your internet location needs to be easily found by the right target  audience. You would never open your storefront in a back alley. You never want your site to be relegated to the back pages of the search engines.

In the B&M world you can change your location by renting new space. You can’t do that online. You need to have a search engine expert help you rank on page one for the keyterms that your target audience is using to find your products – whether they’re trying to find you or a competitor selling the same or similar items.

Demographics. In the brick and mortar world, you chose your location based on research. You want to be close to your target audience. You don’t want to be miles away in a strip mall when the people buying your products and services are visiting the Mall of the Americas.

This demographic research needs to be done online, too. If you don’t  know who your target audience is, how can you sell to them? How will you write copy that will appeal to them? How will you know where they hang out? How will you know how to talk with them, how to engage them?

In the world of internet marketing, this research has an added element. Keyword research. Too often business owners (and even some search engine experts) look at only two factors – how many people are searching for that word and how many competitors are going after that word. This information is only one small part of  keyword research.  Using keywords that come from that research without digging deeper and finding the “right” keyterms is not going to result in good sales numbers.

If you’re selling ladies coats, and you insist on ranking for “coats” you will get more traffic. But you will also have a lower ROI due to the number of visitors who are NOT ladies and thus are not finding the product they are looking for. Don’t make the mistake of having “pet” keyword phrases. Let your market be your guide. They use their own pet terms to find you, and their language and terminology should be what you use to attract them.

Marketing. The same marketing you use in the brick and mortar world can be used in online marketing. Yellow Page adverts? List and/or advertise in the Yellow Pages online directories – there are about a dozen of them that reach world wide.

Weekly circulars? Set up an email campaign that is targeted to your buyers, your prospective clients or special interests.  Online coupons are just as effective as print coupons. An opt-in box on your site with a good giveaway can entice prospects to trade their email address for the special free offer to grow that mail list quickly.

Phone solicitation? Use social media – Facebook, Twitter, blogs, Squidoo like sites. Used wisely and well these social sites will bring the customer to you – rather than cold calling and phone hangup frustration.

TV ads? One word – YouTube. Video is even more powerful as an online marketing tool than a 30 second spot on a late night cable show. And in actual fact you can use Google TV ads to make your own ad for commercial TV.

The best way to create an effective internet marketing campaign and successfully bring your business online is to remember the lessons of brick and mortar marketing. They compliment online marketing, they don’t compete with it. As a successful brick and mortar business, you are one step ahead of competitors who only know the online world. Use that hard won knowledge to carve out your online niche.

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How To Avoid the Three Biggest Mistakes in Website Design

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Ever since the long ago days when I taught budding webmasters the rudiments of web design I have been fascinated by the number of ways a website could be presented to the public. Your online presence can be a showcase for your products, inducing a visitor to purchase your goods and services, or it could become an instant turnoff.

Here are some of the most common mistakes I see in web design in the online marketing world.

1. Forgetting there are more browsers than just Internet Explorer. Microsoft in it’s infinite wisdom has always believed that their products are superior to anyone else’s in computerdom. And to reinforce that belief, they try to be sure those products do not follow the same standards every one does.

IE does not handle web sites the same way as other browsers do. As a web designer I’ve gotten used to dropping pieces of code into pages that basically say “Figure out what browser the visitor is using and if it’s IE – do this, this and this so that visitor can actually see and use my page”.

While it has gotten better, IE will still occasionally be the ONLY browser that will work with some sites. How bad is this? Look at your server stats or Google Analytics. There will be stats and graphs detailing who is using what when viewing your site. Notice how many of your visitors are using something OTHER than IE as a browser? Do you want to lose all those visitors because your site can’t be seen correctly (or sometimes at all!) if they are using Safari, or Firefox or Google Chrome?

Solutions: TEST your site – every single page, every single form including checkout pages in IE, Safari and FireFox at the very least. Add Google Chrome, Opera, and Netscape if you want to be certain 99.9% of your visitors can see and use your website.

2. Forgetting why people are coming to your site. I can’t begin to count all the websites I’ve looked at that forgot this vital point. Your visitors don’t care about you. Honest. They are at your site for one or more of these 4 reasons:

  1. They want/need information
  2. They want/need to make a purchase / donation.
  3. They want/need to be entertained.
  4. They want/need to be part of a community.

Your web site needs to solve their problems. It doesn’t exist  just as an additionalSolve visitor problems instead of talking about youmarketing channel. It’s not there just to promote brand awareness or increase sales. It has one primary purpose and everything else is secondary. Your web site needs to exist to solve one of the four problems above.

Solution: Make a list of the pages on your site – leaving out product pages if you have more than a handful of products. Next to each page, enter the number from the above list if that page solves that problem. If you can’t put one of those numbers next to a page – rethink why that page exists and correct it.

Also count how many times the word “I” or your name appears on a page. Then compare that number to the number of times your product or service name appears. Here’s a tool that will quickly handle that chore. Keyword Density Tool

Your website isn’t about you. At least it shouldn’t be unless you’re a Hollywood star or a major sports figure. It should be all about your potential customer and how you have exactly what they need to solve their problem and ease their pain. If your name or “I” appears far more often than your solution to a visitor’s problem, you need to rewrite that page copy.

3. Forgetting that your visitor doesn’t know what your site and company are all about. We have a four second rule in site design. We have four seconds to clearly let a visitor know what the site is all about. That’s half the time of the average “bounce” – how long it takes a visitor to leave your page and move on to the next site. In short – you have 8 seconds to grab that visitor and bring them deeper into your site.

Your tagline under your logo and the first sentence or two of the home page copy needs to give a visitor a CLEAR idea of what you are all about. Your page title also comes into this mix. Many browsers show that title on the address bar.

Have someone who is unfamiliar with your site take a quick look at the first page. If you can – time them and see how long it takes before they can  answer the question “What do we sell/do/service/answer?”

Solution: Make sure you have a GOOD, unique title for each of your pages. Use a tagline under your logo that actually describes what you do. “Big Hands of Hope – It’s all about compassion” tells me NOTHING about you other than you are probably a charity of some sort. “Big Hands of Hope – Saving Africa’s Children” may not be great copy, but it at least gives me a fairly good idea of what I will be reading on this site.

Tomorrow we’ll be back with a few more design tips that will help you make the most of your internet doorway.

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